LDS Church Backing SLC Gay Rights Ordinance Smells

Big news is circulating on the blog sphere that the Mormon Church backs protection of gay rights in Salt Lake City,” as reported by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints owned and operated, Deseret News on Tuesday.

<small>Michael Otterson, Mormon Public Relations (Photo: Tom Smart, Deseret News)</small>

Michael Otterson, Mormon Public Relations (Photo: Tom Smart, Deseret News)

At a public hearing on an employment and housing ordinance, public affairs managing director Michael Otterson said, “The church supports this ordinance because it is fair and reasonable and does not do violence to the institution of marriage.”

LDS support of this ordinance is nothing more than a political strategy to divert attention from the growing Mormon public relations problem of its role in the systematic religious abuse on gays and lesbians.

In Otterson’s statement he suggests same-sex marriage does “violence to the institution of marriage” yet says nothing about violence the Mormon Church has perpetrated against gay and lesbian human beings for generations, and more recently, funding and directing discriminatory initiatives like California’s Prop 8 and Maine’s Question 1.

These same LDS public relations gurus, at the alleged direction of Church leaders, have carefully orchestrated a finely crafted a PR campaign that resulted in a popular vote in two states that by a small majority, that took civil rights away from a minority. Just how “fair and reasonable” is that Mr. Otterson?

Some may say Mormon support of the Salt Lake City ordinance is a step in the right direction; and although, if passed, is a good thing, I suggest as far as the LDS position on this is concerned, it is nothing more than staged publicity stunt and small thing to give up as part of the cost of doing their dirty business.

2 thoughts on “LDS Church Backing SLC Gay Rights Ordinance Smells

  1. I reread Mr. Ottersons statement initially with fairminded “Optimism”. But rereading it a few more times and I was filled with the sense that it was nothing more than a crude public relations gimmick.

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